Price of Privilege
Jessica Dotta - view author info
Cover: Price of Privilege
Price:
14.99 
ISBN:
978-1-4143-7557-1 
Trim Size:
5.5 x 8.25  
Binding:
Softcover 
Release:
January 2015 

Having finally discovered the truth of her birthright, Julia Elliston is determined to outwit Chance Macy at his own game. Holding a secret he’d kill to keep, however, is proving more difficult than she imagined.

Just when Julia thinks she’s managed to untangle herself from Macy’s clutches, he changes tactics with a risky ploy. As the scandal of the century breaks loose, drawing rooms all over London whisper what so far newspapers have not dared to print: Macy’s lost bride is none other than Lord Pierson’s daughter—and one of the most controversial cases of marital law ever seen comes before Victorian courts.

Though Julia knows Macy’s version of events is another masterful manipulation, public opinion is swaying in his favor. Caught in a web of deceit and lies, armed only with a fledgling faith, Julia must face her fiercest trial yet.
Endorsements
In the final book of a trilogy, Dotta completes the story of Julia Elliston, an emotionally scarred woman who discovers she is an heiress. Though the status of her marriage to Chance Macy is unclear (given questions about Macy’s circumstances), Julia weds Edward, her childhood sweetheart and the local vicar. She believes the hardships plaguing her life are finally over, but her happiness is short-lived. Edward’s parents reject Julia, and his congregation decries him for marrying a scandalous woman. The couple heads to London in search of a fresh start, but unbeknownst to Edward, Julia has blackmailed Macy, who vows to get revenge. Julia’s life disintegrates as it becomes clear that Macy will stop at nothing to conceal the secret Julia holds. The story is told in retrospect from Julia’s point of view and will appeal to readers who like dark romanticism. The vast array of characters and their relationships, however, may prove challenging for those not familiar with the two previous books.
Publishers Weekly